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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
in u.s. history. sandy could cause more wind and flood damage than hurricane irene did last year. new york city and especially lower manhattan saw its shares of flooding monday with water reaching record levels in some areas. and speaking of which, cnbc's bertha coombs is live for us outside the new york stock exchange this morning. thank you so much for joining us. can you tell us what conditions are like where you are and what dnlg you' damage you're seeing? >> reporter: it's actually fairly dry. last night in fact the new york stock exchange take to go twitter to dispel rumors that the trading floor was under three feet of water. if you can take a look behind me, the new york stock exchange floor is actually half a floor from the street level where those first balconies are. so for to be under water would be tremendous. we didn't have water in this part of lower manhattan despite that record surge. it was mostly over in the battery. will is significant flooding in several low lying areas especially near rivers. that's on the lower east side. we actually saw a transformer there blow
through like katrina or like irene? >> every storm is different, as i said. we have their own hazards. irene was a storm that moved parallel to the coast with most of the heaviest weather to the right so there were a lot of folks very close to the center in new jersey, for example, that didn't really know that there was a lot going on. this storm instead, first of all, it's much larger than irene. it's coming directly at the coast instead of parallelling it. the effects are spanning hundreds and hundreds of miles, much more so than irene. >> ifill: this storm is hovering with lots of rain centered over one area. how many days do you expect we'll be coping with the fallout from all of that? >> well, i think that it's going to take until wednesday before conditions really significantly improve so that people can get back and start looking at what happened. tomorrow it's still going to be a bad day because the system is going to slow down once it gets towards pennsylvania. it will weaken, but it's going to take a long time for this system to wind down. >> ifill: james franklin of the nat
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. so, this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> certainly having lived through it. i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> there's the possibility of parts of our city flooding or high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: but the streets are crackling not with panic, but with a sort of upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? what do you want to do? panic? we're new yorkers. >> reporter: hard not to enjoy her spirit. agree with her or not. one last bit of news from new york, david. the new york stock exchange announcing late today that they will be closed tomorrow, however, people will still be able to trade stocks online electronically. back to you. >> she was a class
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
a blustery, nasty day. >> before this made landfall, this storm seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer resea
experts predict considerable flooding in an area that has little elevation. last year, irene, and driving through the wall street area. now, last year, you and i were standing almost exactly here to get a very different situation. the surge isn't going to bring just water. it's going to bring force. and that's why we don't know how it will affect an area like this already in evacuation. people aren't living in the area where we are right now. if the forecasters, not you, sam, but everybody in general, close to accurate, this place is going to look very different tomorrow. maybe permanently. >> chris, we're standing right here where the water is up on the edge. last year where we were here, the water was two or feet below that. didn't really get to the top until the middle of the storm. >> absolutely. >> amy. >> chris, sam, thanks so much. we want to take a look at times square. because normally at this hour, it's crammed with traffic. well, look at that, it is a virtual ghost town. sandy has forced officials to shut down the subways for the second time in its history. josh is out on times
irene caused $4 billion in uninsured losses this year. this is considerably more damaging. potential damage is new york city, it's harbor, 90-degree angle between long island and the coast making it unusually susceptible to flooding. >> we will continue to track storm sandy as the damage mounts. we'll have continuing coverage at 11:00 plus an extended one hour edition of "nightline" at 11:35 both of those programs on abc7. spencer is watching our weather. >> whata amazing weather system. tropical system meeting a cold winter air mass. we have calm conditions here. here is a live view high definition east bay hills camera looking out over the bay on night that is mainly clear. there is fog along the coast and some patches of fog that have begun to push out. live doppler 7-hd. you can see patchy fog pushing along the coastline. areas of dense fog during the overnight hours especially north bay valleys. temperatures right now, still pretty much on the mild side. a cool 57 in san francisco, 55 up in san francisco and visibility is pretty good. ten miles or more which is good because the
you compare this to other events you've seen? >> let's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at b
, irene rosenfeld on the wall of shame. but when we got wind of the breakup, i look rosen felt off the wall and congratulated her and said you absolutely had to buy kraft because it was going much higher that was on november 10th last year. since then if you held on the kraft you wracked up a 26% gain. that was all about people anticipating the breakup. but now that the breakup has arrived, now we have to decide what to do with the pieces. on october 1st, kraft officially split into two separate companies. if you own kraft in the old kraft foods, you now find yourself owning k-r-a-f-t, the kraft foods group that includes oscar mayer, lunch meat, as well as kraft and velveeta cheese. by the way, this can survive thermonuclear war virtually unscathed, as well as maxwell house, which is, you know, well, i think it's ghast -- gastrointestinally too difficult. and mondelez, truly iconic brands, oreos, chips ahoy, cadbury chocolates. so what's the next move? do we ring the register on both because the breakup catalyst has come and gone, the trade is over? do we keep owning both because b
here during hurricane irene. hurricane sandy is coming on strong. here's what he had to say yesterday around 4:00 in the afternoon. take a listen. >> i haven't seen a whole lot worse than this and the storm is already hundreds of miles -- it's still hundreds of miles away. so what it will be when it actually hits is very concerning. that's why we're asking people to treat this really seriously. >> reporter: it looks like a lot of people out here in rehoboth beach are taking this seriously, although we still have seen a lot of folks out here deciding to ride out the storm. you are seeing the 14-foot, 15- foot tall waves crashing into the rehoboth beach boardwalk. all the businesses right along the beach have all boarded up. they are all closed down and they're going to stay this way for several more days. lots of sandbags, lots of boarded up, taped windows. really a ghost town over there. you can see the waves just creeping closer and closer to the shore. we are still three hours away from high tide. farther down in ocean city, i believe their boardwalk is still standing. social media
, the water level should be somewhere right about here on this marble. with irene, it was about a foot, two feet shorter than this. that's one of the things we'll be watching with the subway system. if the saltwater gets in, there's corrosion, it's a mess. that would be a multi-million dollar disaster. the last time that happened was with dawn. well up the eeriest sound, the wind whipping 20, 30 miles an hour higher than what we're dealing with down here at the surface, there are two cranes attached up there. they've been shaking all day. but it's just a fascinating storm. it's 58 degrees in new york city. yet there's a storm surge coming up, the highest we've ever seen in new york city's recorded history. just an amazing storm, guys. i'm going to go on record, i won't admit it to him, you can tell doug kammerer he did pretty well on this one. >> all right. we'll tell him you said that. bill, i want to ask you this, here in the washington area, most of the local officials told the folks to stay indoors to shelter in place, stay off the streets. and everywhere we go, we see people who are st
on the screen under the name of irene dunn. [laughter] at my age i have from time to time started thinking about the end of things, and it has occurred to me that when my time does come, i hope to go the way my dear old grandfather did can, quiet ri in his sleep -- quietly in the his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i've ever met. we all loved andrew, and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was loved so much by andrew, and he said i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from the wonder years. [laughter] and he just was so full of heart, and the thing i loved most about andrew in terms of his public persona was how people on the left hated him until they met him, and then they started loving him. the new yorker sent a woman out to l.a. where we all lived to do a piece on him, and they did a long piece. she spent ten days, he brought the woman over to our house, and i thought they would do a hatchet job, they did a love letter. she loved him. "the new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in th
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toƩ@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
, under the name of irene dunne. at my age i have some from time to time started thinking about the end of things and it has occurred to me when my time does come i hope to go the way my dear old grand father did, quietly in his sleep, not screaming like the passengers in his car. [laughter] andrew made me laugh more than anybody i have ever met. we all loved andrew and andrew loved us. my wife, ali mills, was, loved so much by andrew and he said, i never dreamed that i would be in the same family with the mother from ""the wonder years"". he was so full of heart. the think i love most about andrew in terms his public persona how people on the left hated him until they met him and they started loving him. the "new yorker", sent a woman out to l.a. where we all live to do a piece on him. they did a long piece. she spent 10 days. brought the woman over to our house to meet us. i thought they would do a hatchet job. they did a love letter. she loved him. she couldn't say bad things about him. "new york times" wrote two major pieces about him in the last year of his life and they were both
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)